highlights

publications

Harmonizing hybridization dissonance in conservation.

A dramatic increase in the hybridization between historically allopatric species has been induced by human activities. However, the notion of hybridization seems to lack consistency in two respects. On the one hand, it is inconsistent with the biological species concept, which does not allow for interbreeding between species, and on the other hand, it is considered either as an evolutionary process leading to the emergence of new biodiversity or as a cause of biodiversity loss, with conservation implications. In the first case, we argue that conservation biology should avoid the discussion around the species concept and delimit priorities of conservation units based on the impact on biodiversity if taxa are lost. In the second case, we show that this is not a paradox but an intrinsic property of hybridization, which should be considered in conservation programmes. We propose a novel view of conservation guidelines, in which human-induced hybridization may also be a tool to enhance the likelihood of adaptation to changing environmental conditions or to increase the genetic diversity of taxa affected by inbreeding depression. The conservation guidelines presented here represent a guide for the development of programmes aimed at protecting biodiversity as a dynamic evolutionary system.

news

National Geographic Readers: Animals That Change Color

Michel Milinkovitch served as the scientific advisor for the content of the issue ‘Animals That Change Colors’ of the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS magazine.

events

Epigenetic switching in seasonal timing

08.09.2020 17:00, A150 (Sciences II)

Dame Caroline Dean (The John Innes Center, Norwich, UK).
hosted by: Thanos Halazonetis.

Research

Our department hosts 12 research laboratories gathering close to 200 scientists, engineers and technical staff. Research topics cover a large variety of topics, such as developmental genetics and neurogenetics, regeneration, evo-devo, physics of biology, phylogenetics or anthropology.

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Education

Teaching life sciences at the University of Geneva is an important duty for all staff scientists. In addition to the bachelor programme, we also propose specific masters and PhD specialisations through various programmes.

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contact

Department of Genetics and Evolution
Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 30
1205 Geneva
Switzerland

office: 4002A
T: +41 22 379 67 85

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